Kampala Injects Shs 3Bn In New ‘Walking’ Project As Its Congestion Swells

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Congestion the city has led to traffic jam in Kampala and it is one of the key issues KCCA has to handle.
Congestion the city has led to traffic jam in Kampala and it is one of the key issues KCCA has to handle.

When Madam Jennifer Musisi became Executive Director of Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA), its congestion issues had swollen to uncontrollable figures, the jam within the city centre is awful but with the proposed implementation of a 3 billion shillings pilot project on Non-Motorized Transport (NMT) project in the city; there is hope.

The pilot project which does away with use of motor cars is to encourage walking and cycling and is to be piloted on Namirembe Road and Luwum Street. Foinstance, motorists coming from Entebbe can join Kampala road by the Steers Junction.

No cars, however, will be allowed to drive down to join Entebbe road from Steers Junction. They can only use Market Street to join Entebbe road. The road along Bata Shop to Gazaland will be completely free for pedestrians and cyclists.

Evidently with the poverty prevalence in the country, less than 15% of people in Kampala own a motorized vehicles and pedestrians represent 50% of traffic related fatalities in Kampala according to a survey carried out by KCCA.

The multibillion pilot project for Kampala is spearheaded by KCCA partnering with Mobility Consultants, UN HABITAT, Goudappel Africa and Move Mobility. The ground breaking of the pilot project is to take place in July 2015 according to Jacob Byamukama, Manager Transport Planning and Traffic Management in KCCA. He said that the pilot project will take between 18 and 24 months for completion.

Peter Kaujju, the Spokesperson of KCCA, explained that space for non-motorized transport is space to walk, cycle, or be able to use your wheelchair to safely reach to your destination. NMT will help city users to save on fuel costs, improve physical fitness and generally know their city better.

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6 thoughts on “Kampala Injects Shs 3Bn In New ‘Walking’ Project As Its Congestion Swells”

  1. At last pedestrians are remembered otherwise motorists show no respect to road users especially walkers. Ugandans we have become a lazy nation and encouraged careless boda boda to operative without permits and safety equipments. However, this is a good idea as people in Netherlands are less obese compared to other EU countries.

  2. Peter Kaujju, the Spokesperson of KCCA,
    explained that space for non-motorized transport is space to walk,
    cycle, or be able to use your wheelchair to safely reach to your
    destination.The road along Bata Shop to Gazaland will be completely free for pedestrians and cyclists.Although it is good to have free walking space for pedestrians, it is good to develop a wider view of the concept of free walking space. First, existing roads are too narrow and few. Thus cutting off just one narrow road complicates the problem. The answer solution is simple. Widen existing roads and open up new ones. This might of course involve breaking down some structures to provide space for new roads. Otherwise, the above is just a short term fix that will result into traffic snarl up.

    1. To be honest to you Kampala city is too small. All buildings needs to be demolished and get a town planner and start fresh. I visited Netherlands and they have got big spaces for cyclists and pedestrians. Although creating one way would be an alternative. If we can have areas planed like kololo. It is necessary to make basics available within 10km to reduce high population flooding into Kampala.

      1. Ruth, KCCA has no starting point. First, does KCCA have a master plan? A master plan acts as a blue print for development. In its absence, you find trial and error solutions as the case above. True, cities like Amsterdam are well planned. Infact, a stone throw away from Kampala, Nairobi, Dares Salaam and Kigali have master plans in place. Development in these cities are guided by adhering to details in the master plan. For example, in Nairobi or Kigali, urban authorities can not issue permits to construction activities not defined in the plan. In Kampala, the master plan is resident in someones head. So approvals of plans are based on your political affiliation rather than the strategic outlook of the city. Some few narrow roads have been closed and made private property. How does KCCA explain this? Is it a solution to decongesting Kampala? Not at all. What about houses constructed in Road reserves or green spaces? The whole thing is messed up. As long as KCCA does not have a master plan, you will always here of elephant projects such as cable cars, trams and now the talk of Railway. Where will these infrastructure be located, KCCA seems to ignore this.

  3. I like this idea of putting into consideration the pedestrian’s safety. However, to make this more meaningful, I suggest that roads clearly be demarcated, with bicycles and foot marks or painted green for that matter like I see around Baltimore city in the US.
    Also make it a great offence for running over a pedestrian in this area with fines of say 10 years in prison once proven guilty.
    Increase on the minutes of pedestrians say around Kampala road to allow the disabled and wheel chair persons enjoy the road too at zebra crossings otherwise the minutes currently allow one to run through the road.

  4. This might end up the same way the hurried conversion of two-way streets into one-way caused confusion and led to some being reverted to their original status.
    Issues of this nature require careful pre-implementation studies to assess the impact on other sectors not necessarily visible at the start of an idea.
    It is going to be expensive to rush with a solution which will be reversed after a hefty spending.

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