Uganda maintains World corruption ranking

The 2014 Transparency International graft index has been released, and Uganda still ranks high up as one of the most corrupt countries, the 142th most corrupt country in the world.

Minister of Works and Transportation, Eng. Ibrahim Byandala is on the spot over the Katosi road saga just in time for the 2014 Transparency International graft index release.
Minister of Works and Transportation, Eng. Ibrahim Byandala is on the spot over the Katosi road saga just in time for the 2014 Transparency International graft index release.

With a score of 26%, Uganda remains the second most corrupt country in East Africa after Kenya at 25 percent for a second year running.

corruptThe findings do reveal that the public perceives politicians, judges and the police to be the most corrupt. The report comes at a time when the country is awash with revelations of abuse of office and corruption in various ministries, the police investigation department currently probing cases of alleged cases in different ministries.

Most prominent is investigations into UNRA was conned of Shs 24.8 billion in the ongoing Mukono-Katosi Road saga among others.

Rwanda ranked among the top ten least corrupt countries in the region, its leadership will be alarmed to note it was among the biggest sliders from last year’s ranking a four-position slip. At least one person in four has paid a bribe to a public body in the last year, the report found. Most African countries have poor scores when it comes to bribery.

This least corrupt tag is however relative, as is perception itself; only four countries—Botswana, Cape Verde, Seychelles and Mauritius—had a score of 50 or higher, backing Transparency International’s assertion that the overall global picture is one of alarm.

The much-watched index places countries based on how corrupt its public sector is perceived to be. It then ranks them on a scale of 0-100, with the best performers having the highest scores, while those with a mountain to climb tend towards zero.

The watchdog says that because corruption is typically hidden, hard data is hard to come by, informing its model of culling perceptions from authoritative sources such as the African Development Bank, the World Economic Forum and the World Bank. To further compact the results, it then combines existing surveys and assessments into a single index.

This year some 175 countries were ranked. More than two-thirds of these scored less than 50, the highest possible score being 100.

Overall, Denmark, with a score of 92 from a possible 100, is seen as the least corrupt country with New Zealand, Finland, Sweden and Norway filling out the five leading countries.

Transparency International says that such well-performing countries must play their role in stopping the worst performers from getting away with corruption.

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