South Sudan Ceasefire Takes Effect

The UN estimates that considerably more than 1,000 people have been killed during the conflict
The UN estimates that considerably more than 1,000 people have been killed during the conflict

A ceasefire agreement has come into effect in South Sudan, despite allegations of fresh attacks.

UN deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said there had been “sporadic fighting” in certain areas, some of it after the ceasefire had begun.

The government and rebels signed the ceasefire agreement on Thursday after talks in Ethiopia.

More than 500,000 people have been forced from their homes during the month-long conflict.

Correspondents say that effective monitoring of the truce will be vital, as tension between the two sides is very high.

The talks have now been adjourned and are due to continue on 7 February.

Earlier, Brigadier General Lul Ruai Koang, a spokesman for the opposition, accused government forces of attacking rebel positions in Unity state and Jonglei state on Friday.

The ceasefire was agreed on Thursday after talks in Ethiopia
The ceasefire was agreed on Thursday after talks in Ethiopia

Military spokesman Colonel Philip Aguer said he was not aware of any new violence, and that clashes had taken place before the ceasefire was signed.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said there was a “necessity to continue without delay a national political dialogue to reach a comprehensive peace agreement”.

His spokesman, Farhan Haq, said the dialogue should include all political and civil society representatives as well as detainees from the rebel side.

The UN’s World Food Programme said on Friday that more than 3,700 tonnes of food, enough to feed 220,000 people for a month, had been stolen from its warehouses during the fighting.

BBC

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