The construction of the ward that is underway at the hospital saw well-wishers contribute over 300 million shillings in the first Cancer run held in 2012. It is hoped that the August 25th- 2013 edition will be able to raise enough funds to complete work on the ward.
Rotarians in Uganda are moving towards bridging the Cancer gap in Uganda by constructing the first ever cancer ward at Nsambya hospital.

The Rotarians are seeking for 1.1 billion shillings to construct a 32 bed capacity ward at the hospital to treat cancer patients.

The construction of the ward that is underway at the hospital saw well-wishers contribute over 300 million shillings in the first Cancer run held in 2012. It is hoped that the August 25th- 2013 edition will be able to raise enough funds to complete work on the ward.

Sarah Zawedde Ssentongo, a case manager at the Oncology department, says Nsambya hospital started treating cancer patients in November 2012. She is only one of the three trained nurses in Oncology to handle cancer patients at the hospital.

Ssentongo says they previously treated patients in other wards but have maintained a day care treatment for patients and can only offer chemotherapy patients. This means those who need radiotherapy treatment have to be sent to Mulago national referral hospital.

The cancer case manager states that they receive about 13 to 16 cancer patients per month, but some fail to continue with treatment because of the cost. The cheapest dose starts from 30,000 shillings. The patients seen according to Ssentongo have cases of cervical cancer, Kaposi sarcoma, Breast and Colon cancer.

The Governor Bank of Uganda Prof Emmanuel Mutebile who launched the 2013 Rotary Cancer run announced a 20 million shilling contribution from BOU.

Currently Uganda has the highest infection rates in the world with 60% of cancer infections. Survival rates of preventable and treatable cancer infections stand at 10%.

Experts blame this on patients who go for diagnosis at later stages of illness when treatment is often least effective.

With a three year plan to fight cancer Centenary Bank which has so far contributed 283 million shillings has been carrying out free Cancer awareness campaigns through screening of patients.

Beatrice Lugalambi of Centenary Bank reveals that they have screened 2000 women in ten districts including Jinja, Nabweru, Arua, Kalisizo and Kitgum among others.

Each year, 1.5 million people worldwide die from infection-related cancers. According to the World Health Organization, 22% of all cancers worldwide are the result of a chronic infection and the percentage is growing.

Viral and bacterial infections have been identified as a contributing factor in lymphoma, sarcoma, liver cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, stomach cancer, and cervical cancer.

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